Thomas Youm,MD,FRCS
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News Updates

  • Why treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes is so difficult

    Source: Science Daily

    Despite increasing medical knowledge, treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes remains one of the most challenging tasks in sports medicine. Results of treatment as not as predictable as patients, doctors or coaches would like to think.

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  • Osteoporosis: Steroid Danger

    Source: Ivanhoe

    10-million Americans have osteoporosis and 18-million more are at risk. The bone disease leads to an increase in fractures in the hip, spine and wrist accounting for one-point-five million painful fractures each year and one woman’s harrowing story of recovery is inspiring.

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  • Link possible between oral contraceptive use, ACL injury in females

    Source: Healio

    Researchers from Denmark have uncovered a potential link between oral contraceptive use and instances of ACL injuries that required surgical intervention in women. The researchers evaluated 4,497 women who were treated operatively for an ACL injury between July 2005 and December 2011 and 8,858 age-matched, uninjured controls.

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  • The difficulties of treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers

    Source: Medical News Today

    Results of treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes are not as predictable as doctors, patients and coaches would like to think, according to a report in the journal Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America.

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  • Thumbs-up for mind-controlled robotic arm

    Source: Science Daily

    A paralyzed woman who controlled a robotic arm using just her thoughts has taken another step towards restoring her natural movements by controlling the arm with a range of complex hand movements.

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  • Staying at Home for Knee Rehab

    Source: DailyRx

    After a knee replacement, there’s no place like home for your physical therapy — or at least home may be just as good a place as a clinic to do your exercises.

    In a new study, knee replacement patients who followed a six-week, monitored exercise program at home showed similar progress to those who were in regular outpatient rehabilitation programs.

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  • Frequent BMD tests unnecessary for postmenopausal women with good scores

    Source: Healio

    Postmenopausal women not diagnosed for osteoporosis on an initial bone mineral density test are unlikely to sustain a major osteoporotic fracture or to reap any benefit from repeat screening before age 65 years, according to research published in Menopause.

    “This longitudinal study found that, among postmenopausal women aged 50 to 64 years without osteoporosis on their first BMD test, less than 1% experienced a hip or clinical vertebral fracture and less than 3% experienced a major osteoporotic fracture by 7 years,” the researchers wrote.

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  • Frequent BMD tests unnecessary for postmenopausal women with good scores

    Source: Healio

    Postmenopausal women not diagnosed for osteoporosis on an initial bone mineral density test are unlikely to sustain a major osteoporotic fracture or to reap any benefit from repeat screening before age 65 years, according to research published in Menopause.

    “This longitudinal study found that, among postmenopausal women aged 50 to 64 years without osteoporosis on their first BMD test, less than 1% experienced a hip or clinical vertebral fracture and less than 3% experienced a major osteoporotic fracture by 7 years,” the researchers wrote.

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  • Overuse injuries becoming more common in young athletes

    Source : Science Daily

    From Little League players injuring their elbow ligaments to soccer and basketball players tearing their ACLs, sports injuries related to overuse are becoming more common in younger athletes.

    Dr. Matthew Silvis, medical director for primary care sports medicine at Penn State Hershey, says specialization is a big reason why.

    "It has been a kind of societal thing that kids are specializing in one sport at the exclusion of others at a younger age," he says. "The specialization is often driven by parents who believe that their child has to start early and stay serious in order to get a scholarship or be the best."

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  • Picture emerges of how kids get head injuries

    Source : Science Daily

    A study in which more than 43,000 children were evaluated for head trauma offers an unprecedented picture of how children most frequently suffer head injuries, report physicians. The findings also indicate how often such incidents result in significant brain injuries, computerized tomography (CT) scans to assess head injuries, and neurosurgery to treat them.

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